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Curr HIV/AIDS Rep. 2015 Dec;12(4):500-15. doi: 10.1007/s11904-015-0280-x.

Youth, Technology, and HIV: Recent Advances and Future Directions.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 130 Mason Farm Road, Bioinformatics Building CB#7030, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA. lisa_hightow@med.unc.edu.
2
Department of Health Behavior, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 306 Rosenau Hall Campus Box 7440, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599-7440, USA. kmuessig@med.unc.edu.
3
Department of Health Behavior and Health Education School of Public Health, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, SPH I, Room 3822, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-2029, USA. jbauerme@umich.edu.
4
Department of Health Behavior, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 306 Rosenau Hall Campus Box 7440, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599-7440, USA. czhang88@ad.unc.edu.
5
Center for Health Policy and Inequalities Research Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, 310 Trent Dr., Room 305, Durham, NC, 27710, USA. sara.legrand@duke.edu.

Abstract

Technology, including mobile technologies and social media, offers powerful tools to reach, engage, and retain youth and young adults in HIV prevention and care interventions both in the USA and globally. In this report, we focus on HIV, technology, and youth, presenting a synthesis of recently published (Jan 2014-May 2015) observational and experimental studies relevant for understanding and intervening on HIV risk, prevention, and care. We present findings from a selection of the 66 relevant citations identified, highlighting studies that demonstrate a novel approach to technology interventions among youth in regard to content, delivery, target population, or public health impact. We discuss current trends globally and in the USA in how youth are using technology, as well as emergent research issues in this field-including the need for new theories for developing technology-based HIV interventions and new metrics of engagement, exposure, and evaluation.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescent; HIV; Internet; Intervention; Mobile phone; Smartphone; Social media; Teen; Youth; eHealth; mHealth

PMID:
26385582
PMCID:
PMC4643403
DOI:
10.1007/s11904-015-0280-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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