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J Am Coll Cardiol. 2015 Sep 22;66(12):1378-91. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2015.07.037.

Cardiovascular Effects of Exposure to Cigarette Smoke and Electronic Cigarettes: Clinical Perspectives From the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease Section Leadership Council and Early Career Councils of the American College of Cardiology.

Author information

1
Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina. Electronic address: morrispa@musc.edu.
2
Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan.
3
John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute, Ochsner Clinical School-The University of Queensland School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana.
4
Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York.
5
University of Utah Health Science Center, Salt Lake City, Utah.
6
Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford University, Stanford, California.
7
Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.
8
Northeast Ohio Medical University College of Medicine, Rootstown, Ohio.
9
University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida.
10
Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan; King Abdul-Aziz Cardiac Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
11
Baylor College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida.
12
UCSF Fresno, Fresno, California.
13
The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.
14
University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California.

Abstract

Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality as a result of inhaled tobacco products continues to be a global healthcare crisis, particularly in low- and middle-income nations lacking the infrastructure to develop and implement effective public health policies limiting tobacco use. Following initiation of public awareness campaigns 50 years ago in the United States, considerable success has been achieved in reducing the prevalence of cigarette smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke. However, there has been a slowing of cessation rates in the United States during recent years, possibly caused by high residual addiction or fatigue from cessation messaging. Furthermore, tobacco products have continued to evolve faster than the scientific understanding of their biological effects. This review considers selected updates on the genetics and epigenetics of smoking behavior and associated cardiovascular risk, mechanisms of atherogenesis and thrombosis, clinical effects of smoking and benefits of cessation, and potential impact of electronic cigarettes on cardiovascular health.

KEYWORDS:

atherogenesis; genetic and epigenetic effects; smoke-free legislation; thrombosis; tobacco cessation

PMID:
26383726
DOI:
10.1016/j.jacc.2015.07.037
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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