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Br J Psychiatry. 2016 Feb;208(2):153-9. doi: 10.1192/bjp.bp.114.159087. Epub 2015 Sep 17.

Structural and functional brain changes in delusional disorder.

Author information

1
Victor Vicens, MD, FIDMAG Germanes Hospitalàries, CIBERSAM, Sant Boi de Llobregat, Spain, Benito Menni CASM, Barcelona, Spain and Psychiatry and Mental Health Program, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Joaquim Radua, MD, BStat, PhD, FIDMAG Germanes Hospitalàries, CIBERSAM, Sant Boi de Llobregat, Spain and Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK; Raymond Salvador, BStat, PhD, Maria Anguera-Camós, BSc, Erick J. Canales-Rodríguez, BSc, Salvador Sarró, MD, FIDMAG Germanes Hospitalàries, CIBERSAM, Sant Boi de Llobregat, Spain; Teresa Maristany, MD, Hospital Sant Joan de Déu infantil, Barcelona, Spain; Peter J. McKenna, MD, Edith Pomarol-Clotet, MD, PhD, FIDMAG Germanes Hospitalàries, CIBERSAM, Sant Boi de Llobregat, Spain.
2
Victor Vicens, MD, FIDMAG Germanes Hospitalàries, CIBERSAM, Sant Boi de Llobregat, Spain, Benito Menni CASM, Barcelona, Spain and Psychiatry and Mental Health Program, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Joaquim Radua, MD, BStat, PhD, FIDMAG Germanes Hospitalàries, CIBERSAM, Sant Boi de Llobregat, Spain and Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK; Raymond Salvador, BStat, PhD, Maria Anguera-Camós, BSc, Erick J. Canales-Rodríguez, BSc, Salvador Sarró, MD, FIDMAG Germanes Hospitalàries, CIBERSAM, Sant Boi de Llobregat, Spain; Teresa Maristany, MD, Hospital Sant Joan de Déu infantil, Barcelona, Spain; Peter J. McKenna, MD, Edith Pomarol-Clotet, MD, PhD, FIDMAG Germanes Hospitalàries, CIBERSAM, Sant Boi de Llobregat, Spain jradua@fidmag.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Delusional disorder has been the subject of very little investigation using brain imaging.

AIMS:

To examine potential structural and/or functional brain abnormalities in this disorder.

METHOD:

We used structural imaging (voxel-based morphometry, VBM) and functional imaging (during performance of the n-back task and whole-brain resting connectivity analysis) to examine 22 patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for delusional disorder and 44 matched healthy controls.

RESULTS:

The patients showed grey matter reductions in the medial frontal/anterior cingulate cortex and bilateral insula on unmodulated (but not on modulated) VBM analysis, failure of de-activation in the medial frontal/anterior cingulate cortex during performance of the n-back task, and decreased resting-state connectivity in the bilateral insula.

CONCLUSIONS:

The findings provide evidence of brain abnormality in the medial frontal/anterior cingulate cortex and insula in delusional disorder. A role for the former region in the pathogenesis of delusions is consistent with several other lines of evidence.

PMID:
26382955
DOI:
10.1192/bjp.bp.114.159087
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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