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Environ Int. 2015 Dec;85:96-103. doi: 10.1016/j.envint.2015.09.005. Epub 2015 Sep 15.

Maternal urinary bisphenol A levels and infant low birth weight: A nested case-control study of the Health Baby Cohort in China.

Author information

1
Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education & Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China.
2
CDC of Yangtze River Administration and Navigational Affairs, General Hospital of the Yangtze River Shipping, Wuhan 430019, China.
3
Women and Children Medical and Healthcare Center of Wuhan, Wuhan, Hubei, China.
4
Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education & Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China. Electronic address: liyuanyuan@hust.edu.cn.
5
Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education & Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China. Electronic address: xust@hust.edu.cn.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Exposure to bisphenol A (BPA), a known endocrine disruptor, has been demonstrated to affect fetal development in animal studies, but findings in human studies have been inconsistent.

OBJECTIVES:

We investigated whether maternal exposure to BPA during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of infant low birth weight (LBW).

METHODS:

A total 452 mother-infant pairs (113 LBW cases and 339 matched controls) were selected from the participants enrolled in the prospective Health Baby Cohort (HBC) in Wuhan city, China, during 2012-2014. BPA concentrations were measured in maternal urine samples collected at delivery, and the information of birth outcomes was retrieved from the medical records. A conditional logistic regression was used to evaluate the relationship between urinary BPA levels and LBW.

RESULTS:

Mothers with LBW infants had significantly higher urinary BPA levels (median: 4.70μg/L) than the control mothers (median: 2.25μg/L) (p<0.05). Increased risk of LBW was associated with higher maternal urinary levels of BPA [adjusted odds ratio (OR)=3.13 for the medium tertile, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.21, 8.08; adjusted OR=2.49 for the highest tertile, 95% CI: 0.98, 6.36]. The association was more pronounced among female infants than among male infants, with a statistical evidence of heterogeneity in risk (p=0.03).

CONCLUSIONS:

Prenatal exposure to higher levels of BPA may potentially increase the risk of delivering LBW infants, especially for female infants. This is the first case-control study to examine the association in China.

KEYWORDS:

Bisphenol A; Case–control; Low birth weight; Pregnancy; Urine

PMID:
26382648
DOI:
10.1016/j.envint.2015.09.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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