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J Diabetes Metab Disord. 2015 Sep 14;14:70. doi: 10.1186/s40200-015-0200-z. eCollection 2015.

Association between serum uric acid level and metabolic syndrome components.

Author information

1
Non-Communicable Disease Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Population Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
2
Department of Community Medicine, School of Medicine, Alborz University of Medical Sciences, Baghestan Boulevard, Karaj, Iran ; Non-Communicable Disease Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Population Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
3
Department of Cardiology, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Child Growth and Development Research Center, Research Institute for Primordial Prevention of Non-communicable Disease, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.
5
Department of Medical Emergency, Qom University of Medical Sciences, Qom, Iran.
6
Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center (EMRC) Institute, Dr Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, North Kargar St, Tehran, Iran.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Serum uric acid levels is reported to be associated with a variety of cardiometabolic risk factors; however, its direct association with metabolic syndrome (MetS) remains controversial. Thus, we examined the association of serum uric acid concentrations with the MetS components.

METHODS:

MetS was defined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) criteria. This case-control study comprised 101 non-smoking individuals (41 in the MetS group and 60 in the non-MetS group). Blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR, lipid profiles, uric acid, and anthropometric measures were determined, and body composition was assessed by using bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA).

RESULTS:

After adjustment for confounding factors, serum uric acid was significantly higher in MetS group than non-MetS group (5.70 ± 1.62 vs 4.97 ± 1.30 mg/dL, respectively, P = 0.001). After controlling for age, sex and body mass index in partial correlation analysis, uric acid was positively correlated with triglycerides, and negatively with HDL-C. In multiple logistic regression analysis, every 1 mg/dl elevation in the serum uric acid level increased the risk of MetS approximately by 2-folds (OR: 2.11, 95 % CI: 1.30-3.41).

CONCLUSION:

This study showed that those individuals with MetS have higher uric acid levels; the association of uric acid and MetS components supports that it might be an additional components of MetS.

KEYWORDS:

Body composition; Insulin resistance; Metabolic syndrome; Uric acid

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