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Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2015 Sep 7;10:1819-27. doi: 10.2147/COPD.S87766. eCollection 2015.

Lung function decline rates according to GOLD group in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Author information

1
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
2
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine and Clinical Research Center for Chronic Obstructive Airway Diseases, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
4
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
5
Department of Internal Medicine, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seongnam, Republic of Korea.
6
Division of Pulmonology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hanyang University Guri Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Guri, Republic of Korea.
7
Division of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
8
Department of Internal Medicine, Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, College of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Since the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) groups A-D were introduced, the lung function changes according to group have been evaluated rarely.

OBJECTIVE:

We investigated the rate of decline in annual lung function in patients categorized according to the 2014 GOLD guidelines.

METHODS:

Patients with COPD included in the Korean Obstructive Lung Disease (KOLD) prospective study, who underwent yearly postbronchodilator spirometry at least three times, were included. The main outcome was the annual decline in postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), which was analyzed by random-slope and random-intercept mixed linear regression.

RESULTS:

A total 175 participants were included. No significant postbronchodilator FEV1 decline was observed between the groups (-34.4±7.9 [group A]; -26.2±9.4 [group B]; -22.7±16.0 [group C]; and -24.0±8.7 mL/year [group D]) (P=0.79). The group with less symptoms (-32.3±7.2 vs -25.0±6.5 mL/year) (P=0.44) and the low risk group (-31.0±6.1 vs -23.6±7.7 mL/year) (P=0.44) at baseline showed a more rapid decline in the postbronchodilator FEV1, but the trends were not statistically significant. However, GOLD stages classified by FEV1 were significantly related to the annual lung function decline.

CONCLUSION:

There was no significant difference in lung function decline rates according to the GOLD groups. Prior classification using postbronchodilator FEV1 predicts decline in lung function better than does the new classification.

KEYWORDS:

GOLD 2014; annual lung function decline; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

PMID:
26379432
PMCID:
PMC4567243
DOI:
10.2147/COPD.S87766
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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