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Br J Cancer. 2015 Nov 3;113(9):1381-8. doi: 10.1038/bjc.2015.333. Epub 2015 Sep 17.

Impact of alcohol drinking on gastric cancer development according to Helicobacter pylori infection status.

Ma SH1,2, Jung W3, Weiderpass E4,5,6,7, Jang J1,8, Hwang Y1,2,8, Ahn C1,8, Ko KP9, Chang SH10, Shin HR11, Yoo KY1, Park SK1,2,8.

Author information

1
Department of Preventive Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
2
Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
3
Department of Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
4
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
5
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
6
Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway.
7
Department of Genetic Epidemiology Group, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland.
8
Department of Biomedical Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
9
Department of Preventive Medicine, Gachon University College of Medicine, Incheon, Korea.
10
Department of Preventive Medicine, Konkuk University, Chungju, Korea.
11
Non-communicable Disease and Health Promotion, Western Pacific Regional Office, World Health Organization, Manila, Philippines.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Helicobacter pylori are major carcinogen of gastric cancer, but the associations among gastric cancer, H. pylori infection status, and alcohol consumption are not fully described. This study aimed to clarify how H. pylori infection status affects the association between alcohol consumption and gastric cancer risk.

METHODS:

We selected 949 case-cohort participants from the 18,863 Korean Multi-center Cancer Cohort (KMCC) populations. Gastric cancer incidence inside and outside of the subcohort were 12 and 254 cases, respectively. Seropositivities for CagA, VacA, and H. pylori infection were determined by performing immunoblot assays. Weighted Cox regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

RESULTS:

Relative to non-drinking, heavy drinking (⩾7 times a week), and binge drinking (⩾55 g alcohol intake per occasion) showed a 3.48-fold (95% CI, 1.13-10.73) and 3.27-fold (95% CI, 1.01-10.56) higher risk in subjects not previously infected by H. pylori. There was no significant association between drinking pattern and gastric cancer risk in H. pylori IgG seropositive subjects. An increased risk for gastric cancer in heavy- and binge-drinking subjects were also present in subjects not infected by CagA- or VacA-secreting H. pylori.

CONCLUSIONS:

Heavy and binge alcohol consumption is an important risk factor related to an increasing incidence of gastric cancer in a population not infected by H. pylori.

PMID:
26379079
PMCID:
PMC4815794
DOI:
10.1038/bjc.2015.333
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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