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Hum Vaccin Immunother. 2015;11(12):2883-94. doi: 10.1080/21645515.2015.1070996. Epub 2015 Sep 17.

Overcoming barriers to HPV vaccination: A randomized clinical trial of a culturally-tailored, media intervention among African American girls.

Author information

1
a Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education ; Emory University Rollins School of Public Health ; Atlanta , GA USA.
2
b Department of Pediatrics ; Division of Infectious Diseases, Epidemiology, and Immunology; Emory University School of Medicine ; Atlanta , GA USA.
3
c ICF International ; Atlanta , GA USA.
4
d Office of Academic Advancement; Emory University Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing ; Atlanta , GA USA.
5
e Salud Para La Gente ; Watsonville , CA USA.

Abstract

Although genital HPV is the most prevalent STI in the US, rates of vaccination uptake among high-risk subgroups remain low. Investigations of vaccine compliance have mainly targeted mother-daughter dyads, which in some settings may prove difficult. This study examines an innovative culturally tailored, computer-delivered media-based strategy to promote HPV vaccine uptake. Data, inclusive of sociodemographics, sexual behaviors, knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about HPV and vaccination were collected via ACASI from 216 African American adolescent females (ages 14-18 years) seeking services in family planning and STI public health clinics in metropolitan Atlanta. Data were obtained prior to randomization and participation in an interactive media-based intervention designed to increase HPV vaccination uptake. Medical record abstraction was conducted 7 month post-randomization to assess initial vaccine uptake and compliance. Participants in the intervention were more compliant to vaccination relative to a placebo comparison condition (26 doses vs. Seventeen doses; p=0.12). However, vaccination series initiation and completion were lower than the national average. Thorough evaluation is needed to better understand factors facilitating HPV vaccine uptake and compliance, particularly perceived susceptibility and the influence of the patient-provider encounter in a clinical setting.

KEYWORDS:

HPV; adolescent; media intervention; vaccination uptake

PMID:
26378650
PMCID:
PMC5054780
DOI:
10.1080/21645515.2015.1070996
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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