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Exp Brain Res. 2016 Jan;234(1):95-104. doi: 10.1007/s00221-015-4415-5. Epub 2015 Sep 16.

Medial temporal lobe activity associated with the successful retrieval of destination memory.

Author information

1
Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan.
2
Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.
3
Department of Behavioral Neurology and Cognitive Neuroscience, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan.
4
Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS), Tokyo, Japan.
5
Division of Systems Neuroscience, Tohoku University Graduate School of Life Sciences, Sendai, Japan.
6
Kansei Fukushi Research Institute, Tohoku Fukushi University, 6-149-1, Kunimigaoka, Aoba-ku, Sendai, 989-3201, Japan. fujimarion1227@gmail.com.

Abstract

Destination memory is the process of remembering to whom we tell particular things. Although recent behavioral studies have clarified the cognitive nature of destination memory, the neural mechanisms underlying destination memory retrieval remain unclear. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to determine whether the medial temporal lobe (MTL), a structure that has been implicated in recollection-based memory, is activated during the successful retrieval of destination information. During a study phase before fMRI scanning, the subjects told a series of facts to either a woman or a man. During fMRI scanning, the subjects were asked to judge whether each fact presented was old or new, and if they judged it as old, to indicate, including a confidence rating (high or low), whether the subjects had told that fact to either a man or a woman. We found that successful destination retrieval, when compared to failed destination retrieval, was associated with increased activity in the parahippocampal gyrus. We also found that the confidence level (high vs. low) for destination memory retrieval was associated with increased activity in another (posterior) region of the parahippocampal gyrus. The present study suggests that the successful retrieval of destination information depends highly on MTL-mediated recollection processes.

KEYWORDS:

Episodic memory; Parahippocampal gyrus; Recognition; Recollection; fMRI

PMID:
26378005
DOI:
10.1007/s00221-015-4415-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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