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Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2016 Apr;89(3):485-95. doi: 10.1007/s00420-015-1087-1. Epub 2015 Sep 16.

Psychosocial work factors and sleep problems: findings from the French national SIP survey.

Author information

1
Department of Social Epidemiology, Pierre Louis Institute of Epidemiology and Public Health, UMR_S 1136, INSERM, 75013, Paris, France.
2
Department of Social Epidemiology, Pierre Louis Institute of Epidemiology and Public Health, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR_S 1136, Sorbonne Universités, 75013, Paris, France.
3
Department of Social Epidemiology, Pierre Louis Institute of Epidemiology and Public Health, UMR_S 1136, INSERM, 75013, Paris, France. isabelle.niedhammer@inserm.fr.
4
Department of Social Epidemiology, Pierre Louis Institute of Epidemiology and Public Health, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR_S 1136, Sorbonne Universités, 75013, Paris, France. isabelle.niedhammer@inserm.fr.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study aimed at exploring the cross-sectional and prospective associations between psychosocial work factors and sleep problems.

METHODS:

The study population consisted of a national representative sample of the French working population (SIP survey). The sample sizes were 7506 and 3555 for the cross-sectional and prospective analyses. Sleep problems were defined by either sleep disturbances or insufficient sleep duration at least several times a week. Psychosocial work factors included classical (job strain model factors) and emergent factors (recognition, insecurity, role/ethical conflict, emotional demands, work-life imbalance, etc.). Occupational factors related to working time/hours and physical work environment were also included as well as covariates related to factors outside work. Statistical analyses were performed using weighted Poisson regression analysis.

RESULTS:

In the cross-sectional analyses, psychological demands, low social support, low recognition, emotional demands, perception of danger, work-life imbalance and night work were found to be associated with sleep problems. In the prospective analyses, psychological demands and night work were predictive of sleep problems. Using a less conservative method, more factors were found to be associated with sleep problems. Dose-response associations were observed, showing that the more frequent the exposure to these factors, the higher the risk of sleep problems. No effect of repeated exposure was found on sleep problems.

CONCLUSION:

Classical and emergent psychosocial work factors were associated with sleep problems. More prospective studies and prevention policies may be needed.

KEYWORDS:

Cross-sectional analyses; Dose–response associations; Insufficient sleep duration; Occupational factors; Prospective analyses; Psychosocial work factors; Sleep disturbances; Sleep problems

PMID:
26376909
DOI:
10.1007/s00420-015-1087-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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