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PLoS One. 2015 Sep 16;10(9):e0138318. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0138318. eCollection 2015.

Micronutrients Involved in One-Carbon Metabolism and Risk of Breast Cancer Subtypes.

Author information

1
Department of Preventive and Predictive Medicine, Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCSS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.
2
Department of Medical Sciences, University of Torino and Human Genetics Foundation (HuGeF), Turin, Italy.
3
Department of Preventive and Predictive Medicine, Environmental Epidemiology Unit, Fondazione IRCSS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.
4
Department of Surgical and Morphological Sciences, University of Insubria, Varese, Italy.
5
Department of Oncology, Faculty of Health Science, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Vitamins involved in one-carbon metabolism are hypothesized to influence breast cancer (BC) risk. However, epidemiologic studies that examined associations between B vitamin intake and BC risk have provided inconsistent results. We prospectively examined, in the Italian ORDET cohort, whether B vitamin consumption was associated with risk of BC and BC subtypes.

METHODS:

After a mean follow-up of 16.5 years, 391 BCs were diagnosed among 10,786 cohort women. B vitamin intakes were estimated from food frequency questionnaires. Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for energy intake and confounders, estimated hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for BC according to intake.

RESULTS:

RRs were 0.61 (95% CI 0.38-0.97 highest vs. lowest quartile; P trend 0.025) for thiamine; 0.48 (95% CI 0.32-0.71; P trend <0.001) for riboflavin; 0.59 (95% CI 0.39-0.90; P trend 0.008) for vitamin B6, and 0.65 (95% CI 0.44-0.95; P trend 0.021) for folate. As regards risk of BC subtypes, high riboflavin and folate were significantly associated with lower risk of estrogen receptor positive (ER+) and progesterone receptor positive (PR+) cancers, and high thiamine was associated with lower risk of ER-PR- cancers. High riboflavin was associated with lower risk of both HER2+ and HER2- cancers, high folate with lower risk of HER2- disease, and high thiamine with HER2+ disease.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings support protective effects of thiamine and one-carbon metabolism vitamins (folate, riboflavin, and vitamin B6) against BC in general; while folate may also protect against ER+PR+ and HER2- disease; and thiamine against ER-PR-, and HER2+ disease.

PMID:
26376452
PMCID:
PMC4574438
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0138318
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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