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Toxicol Mech Methods. 2015;25(7):507-13. doi: 10.3109/15376516.2015.1056395. Epub 2015 Sep 16.

Effect of bisphenol A on blood glucose, lipid profile and oxidative stress indices in adult male mice.

Author information

1
a Department of Agriculture , Payam Noor University , Tehran , Iran and.
2
b Department of Basic Medical Sciences , Neyshabur University of Medical Sciences , Neyshabur , Iran.

Abstract

Bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine-disrupting chemical, has been considered as a possible risk factor for diabetes and its complications. However, the underlying mechanisms of BPA-induced diabetes are not clear. The present study was performed to evaluate the effects of BPA on the hyperglycemia, lipid abnormalities and oxidative stress. In this study, the mice were divided into three groups of six animals each: One group as a control (C) and two other groups which exposed to 0.5 and 2 mg/kg concentrations of BPA. BPA powder was dissolved in sterile extra virgin olive oil and injected intraperitoneally to the tested groups, while the control group only received pure olive oil for 4 weeks. After 4 weeks, the changes of glucose, lipid profile reduced, total protein, glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant status (TAS), catalase (CAT) and super oxide dismutase (SOD) were determined in serum and pancreas. The results indicated that BPA dose-dependently increased the levels of blood glucose, lipid profile and MDA in the tested groups compared with the control group (p < 0.001). BPA reduced significantly the levels of HDL-C and GSH in dose-dependent manner (p < 0.001). BPA injection increased the levels of MDA and decreased the levels of GSH and TAS, and also the activities of SOD and CAT in the pancreas of exposed mice compared with the control group (p < 0.05). In addition, body weight increased in the mice exposed to BPA compare to control animals. These results suggest that BPA exposure might induce hyperglycemia and its complications in adult male mice by induction of oxidative stress.

KEYWORDS:

Adult mice; bisphenol A; lipid profile; oxidative stress indices

PMID:
26376105
DOI:
10.3109/15376516.2015.1056395
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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