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J Nutr Biochem. 2016 Jan;27:27-31. doi: 10.1016/j.jnutbio.2015.08.011. Epub 2015 Aug 20.

The gut microbial community in metabolic syndrome patients is modified by diet.

Author information

1
Lipids and Atherosclerosis Unit, IMIBIC/Reina Sofia University Hospital/University of Cordoba, Cordoba, Spain; CIBER Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Santiago de Compostela, Spain.
2
Instituto de Agricultura Sostenible, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Cordoba, Spain.
3
Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA; Immunology Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA.
4
Lipids and Atherosclerosis Unit, IMIBIC/Reina Sofia University Hospital/University of Cordoba, Cordoba, Spain; CIBER Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Santiago de Compostela, Spain. Electronic address: antonio.camargo@imibic.org.

Abstract

Intestinal microbiota changes may be involved in the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS), which is a multicomponent disorder frequently associated with obesity. The aim of this study was to test the effect of consuming two healthy diets: a Mediterranean diet and a low-fat high-carbohydrate diet, for 2years in the gut microbiota of MetS patients and those in the control group. We analyzed the differences in the bacterial community structure between the groups after 2years of dietary intervention (Mediterranean or low-fat diet) through quantitative polymerase chain reaction using primers, targeting specific bacterial taxa. We observed, at basal time, that the abundance of Bacteroides, Eubacterium and Lactobacillus genera is lower in the control group than in MetS patients, while Bacteroides fragilis group, Parabacteroides distasonis, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Ruminococcus flavefaciens subgroup and Eubacterium rectale are depleted in MetS patients (all P values <.05). Additionally, we found that long-term consumption of Mediterranean diet partially restores the population of P. distasonis, B. thetaiotaomicron, F. prausnitzii, B. adolescentis and B. longum in MetS patients (all P values <.05). Our results suggest that the Mediterranean diet could be a useful tool to restore potentially beneficial members of the gut microbiota, although the stability of these changes over time still remains to be assessed.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiovascular disease; Mediterranean diet; Metabolic syndrome; Microbiota; Obesity

PMID:
26376027
DOI:
10.1016/j.jnutbio.2015.08.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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