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Public Health Nutr. 2016 Jun;19(8):1446-56. doi: 10.1017/S136898001500261X. Epub 2015 Sep 16.

A dose-response meta-analysis reveals an association between vitamin B12 and colorectal cancer risk.

Author information

1
1Department of Anesthesiology,First Hospital of China Medical University,Heping District,Shenyang City,People's Republic of China.
2
2Department of Surgical Oncology and General Surgery,First Hospital of China Medical University,155 North Nanjing Street,Heping District,Shenyang City 110001,People's Republic of China.
3
3Administration Section of the Party and Government Office of China Medical University,Shenyang City,People's Republic of China.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The current meta-analysis evaluated the association between vitamin B12 intake and blood vitamin B12 level and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk.

DESIGN:

The PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched. A dose-response analysis was performed with generalized least squares regression, with the relative risk (RR) and 95 % CI as effect values.

SETTING:

The meta-analysis included seventeen studies.

SUBJECTS:

A total of 10 601 patients.

RESULTS:

The non-linear dose-response relationship between total vitamin B12 intake and CRC risk was insignificant (P=0·690), but the relationship between dietary vitamin B12 intake and CRC risk was significant (P<0·001). Every 4·5 μg/d increment in total and dietary vitamin B12 intake was inversely associated with CRC risk (total intake: RR=0·963; 95 % CI 0·928, 0·999; dietary intake: RR=0·914; 95 % CI 0·856, 0·977). The inverse association between vitamin B12 intake and CRC risk was also significant when vitamin B12 intake was over a dosage threshold, enhancing the non-linear relationship. The non-linear dose-response relationship between blood vitamin B12 level and CRC risk was insignificant (P=0·219). There was an insignificant association between every 150 pmol/l increment in blood vitamin B12 level and CRC risk (RR=1·023; 95 % CI 0·881, 1·187).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our meta-analysis indicates that evidence supports the use of vitamin B12 for cancer prevention, especially among populations with high-dose vitamin B12 intake, and that the association between CRC risk and total vitamin B12 intake is stronger than between CRC risk and dietary vitamin B12 intake only.

KEYWORDS:

Colorectal cancer; Meta-analysis; Vitamin B12

PMID:
26373257
DOI:
10.1017/S136898001500261X
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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