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Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2015 Dec;93(6):1201-7. doi: 10.4269/ajtmh.15-0432. Epub 2015 Sep 14.

Impact of Global Health Research Training on Scholarly Productivity: The Fogarty International Clinical Research Scholars and Fellows Program.

Author information

1
Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee; Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee; Department of Biostatistics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee; Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee; Fogarty International Clinical Research Scholars and Fellows Support Center at Vanderbilt, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee; Office of the Vice President for Research, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia; Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Global Oncology, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington douglas.heimburger@vanderbilt.edu.
2
Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee; Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee; Department of Biostatistics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee; Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee; Fogarty International Clinical Research Scholars and Fellows Support Center at Vanderbilt, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee; Office of the Vice President for Research, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia; Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Global Oncology, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington.

Abstract

In the Fogarty International Clinical Research Scholars and Fellows (FICRS-F) Program, 536 U.S. and international doctoral and postdoctoral health profession students and trainees completed 1-year research training at research centers in low- and middle-income countries. To evaluate the Program's impact, we analyzed data gathered prospectively during the Program, from PubMed, and from a representative survey of alumni. Of 100 randomly selected respondents, 94 returned the survey. Reflecting the sources of funding, human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome was the focus of 47% of the projects, but research in noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) and dual infection/NCD-related topics increased over time. Among the first 1,617 alumni publications, output was associated positively with being an international versus U.S. trainee, a postdoctoral Fellow versus predoctoral Scholar, and accumulation of more years post-training (all P < 0.001). Fellows were first author on a higher proportion of their articles than were Scholars (P < 0.001), and U.S. trainees were more often first author than international trainees (P = 0.04). Survey respondents had submitted 117 grant applications, and 79 (67.5%) had been funded. The FICRS-F Program yielded substantial research productivity in the early post-training years. Research outputs and impact will increase over time as alumni careers mature and they gain research independence and assume leadership positions.

PMID:
26371155
PMCID:
PMC4674235
DOI:
10.4269/ajtmh.15-0432
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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