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Surv Ophthalmol. 2016 Jan-Feb;61(1):83-94. doi: 10.1016/j.survophthal.2015.09.001. Epub 2015 Sep 9.

A systematic review of best practices in teaching ophthalmology to medical students.

Author information

1
Department of Ophthalmology, Save Sight Institute, Discipline of Ophthalmology, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney NSW, Australia; Envision Research Institute, Envision, Wichita, Kansas, USA; The Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute, San Francisco, California, USA.
2
Department of Ophthalmology, Save Sight Institute, Discipline of Ophthalmology, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney NSW, Australia.
3
Department of Ophthalmology, Blanton Eye Institute, Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas, USA; Department of Ophthalmology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, USA; Department of Ophthalmology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York, USA.
4
Department of Ophthalmology, Blanton Eye Institute, Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas, USA; Department of Ophthalmology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, USA; Department of Ophthalmology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York, USA; Department of Neurology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York, USA; Department of Neurological Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York, USA; Department of Ophthalmology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA; Department of Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA; Department of Ophthalmology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. Electronic address: Aglee@houstonmethodist.org.

Abstract

Ophthalmic medical student education is a cornerstone to improving eye health care globally. We review the current state of the literature, listing barriers to potential best practices for undergraduate ophthalmology teaching and learning within medical curricula. We describe recent advances and pedagogical approaches in ophthalmic education and propose specific recommendations for further improvements and research. Future research should concentrate on developing teaching and learning innovations that may result in a more time- and resource-effective models for interactive and integrated learning. As well as demonstrating that a competency-based approach results not just in better eye health, but also improvements in patient care, education, and medical care in general. By optimizing teaching available through improved evidence-based education, the ultimate goal is to increase medical students' knowledge and produce graduates who are highly trained in eye examination skills, resulting in improved patient eye care through timely diagnosis, referrals, and treatment.

KEYWORDS:

Undergraduate ophthalmology; competency-based education; evidence-based curricula; medical student education; systematic review

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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