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Qual Life Res. 2016 Apr;25(4):969-77. doi: 10.1007/s11136-015-1130-4. Epub 2015 Sep 11.

Association between nutritional status and subjective health status in chronically ill children attending special schools.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Intensive Care, Erasmus MC - Sophia Children's Hospital, Dr. Molewaterplein 60, 3015 GJ, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Erasmus MC - Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
3
VUmc School of Medical Sciences, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
4
Ministry of Economic Affairs, The Hague, The Netherlands.
5
Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Erasmus MC - Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
6
Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Intensive Care, Erasmus MC - Sophia Children's Hospital, Dr. Molewaterplein 60, 3015 GJ, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. k.dulfer@erasmusmc.nl.
7
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry/Psychology, Erasmus MC - Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. k.dulfer@erasmusmc.nl.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

In hospitalized children with a chronic disease, malnutrition was associated with a lower subjective health status. In outpatient children with a chronic disease attending special schools, this association has never been studied. The aim of this study was to assess the association between nutritional status and subjective health status in chronically ill children attending special schools.

METHODS:

Overall, 642 children, median age 9.8 years (IQR 7.7-11.5), 60 % male, 72 % Caucasian, were included in this prospective study in nine special schools for chronically ill children in the Netherlands. Overall malnutrition was assessed as: acute malnutrition (<-2 SDS for weight for height (WFH)) and chronic malnutrition (<-2 SDS for height for age). The malnutrition risk was assessed with the nutritional risk-screening tool STRONGkids. Subjective health status was assessed with EQ-5D.

RESULTS:

Overall, 16 % of the children had overall malnutrition: 3 % acute and 13 % chronic malnutrition. Nurses reported 'some/severe problems' on the health status dimensions mobility (15 %), self-care (17 %), usual activities (19 %), pain/discomfort (22 %), and anxiety/depression (22 %) in chronically ill children. Their mean visual analogue scale score (VAS) was 73.0 (SD 11.1). Malnutrition, medication usage, and younger age explained 38 % of the variance of the VAS score.

CONCLUSIONS:

The presence of overall malnutrition in chronically ill children attending special schools was associated with lower subjective health status, especially in younger children and in those with chronic medication usage. Therefore, it is important to develop and use profile-screening tools to identify these children.

KEYWORDS:

Chronic disease; Nutritional status; Paediatrics; Prevalence malnutrition; Quality of life; Subjective health status

PMID:
26362418
PMCID:
PMC4830861
DOI:
10.1007/s11136-015-1130-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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