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Ann Med. 2015;47(6):519-26. doi: 10.3109/07853890.2015.1077989. Epub 2015 Sep 11.

Television viewing and fatty liver in early midlife. The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

Author information

1
a Paavo Nurmi Centre, Department of Health and Physical Activity , University of Turku , Turku , Finland.
2
b Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku , Turku , Finland.
3
c Department of Medicine , University of Turku, Division of Medicine, Turku University Hospital , Turku , Finland.
4
d Murdoch Children's Research Institute , Parkville, Victoria , Australia.
5
e LIKES Research Center for Sport and Health Sciences , Jyväskylä , Finland.
6
f Department of Pediatrics , University of Tampere and Tampere University Hospital , Tampere , Finland.
7
g Department of Clinical Physiology , University of Tampere and Tampere University Hospital , Tampere , Finland.
8
h Department of Clinical Chemistry , Fimlab Laboratories, Tampere University Hospital and School of Medicine, University of Tampere , Tampere , Finland.
9
i Division of Nutrition, Department of Food and Environmental Sciences , University of Helsinki , Helsinki , Finland.
10
j Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine , Turku University Hospital , Turku , Finland.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Both sedentary behaviour and fatty liver are associated with increased risk of obesity and non-communicable diseases, but their relationship remains unknown. We investigated the relationship of television (TV) viewing time with serum gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) and Fatty Liver Index (FLI), and ultrasonographically assessed liver fat.

METHODS:

A total of 1,367 adults of the population-based Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns study (748 women, 619 men, aged 34-49 years) had fasting serum GGT, triglycerides, weight, height, and waist circumference, and self-reported TV time data from 2001, 2007, and 2011. Changes in GGT and FLI, and liver ultrasound images in 2011 were studied in groups with constantly low (≤ 1 h/d), moderate (1-3 h/d), or high (≥ 3 h/d) daily TV time, and in groups with ≥ 1 hour increase/decrease in daily TV time between 2001 and 2011.

RESULTS:

Constantly high TV time was associated with higher GGT and FLI (P < 0.02 in both), and 2.3-fold (95% CI 1.2-4.5) increased risk of fatty liver regardless of age, sex, leisure-time and occupational physical activity, energy intake, diet composition, alcohol use, sleep duration, socioeconomic status, and smoking. Adjustment for BMI partly attenuated the associations.

CONCLUSIONS:

High TV viewing increases fatty liver risk. It may be one mechanism linking sedentary behaviour with increased cardiometabolic disease risks.

KEYWORDS:

Echography; Fatty Liver Index; NAFLD; elevated liver enzymes; fatty liver; liver; non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; sedentary lifestyle; television; ultrasound

PMID:
26362414
DOI:
10.3109/07853890.2015.1077989
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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