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Vasc Health Risk Manag. 2015 Aug 28;11:525-32. doi: 10.2147/VHRM.S74697. eCollection 2015.

LDL electronegativity index: a potential novel index for predicting cardiovascular disease.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatric Nephrology and Growth and Regeneration, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven and University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
2
Laboratory of Angiopathology, Institute of General Pathology and Pathophysiology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia ; Faculty of Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Kensington, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
3
Laboratory of Angiopathology, Institute of General Pathology and Pathophysiology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia ; Institute for Atherosclerosis Research, Skolkovo Innovative Center, Moscow, Russia ; Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Biology, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia.

Abstract

High cardiovascular risk conditions are frequently associated with altered plasma lipoprotein profile, such as elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and LDL cholesterol and decreased high-density lipoprotein. There is, however, accumulating evidence that specific subclasses of LDL may play an important role in cardiovascular disease development, and their relative concentration can be regarded as a more relevant risk factor. LDL particles undergo multiple modifications in plasma that can lead to the increase of their negative charge. The resulting electronegative LDL [LDL(-)] subfraction has been demonstrated to be especially atherogenic, and became a subject of numerous recent studies. In this review, we discuss the physicochemical properties of LDL(-), methods of its detection, atherogenic activity, and relevance of the LDL electronegativity index as a potential independent predictor of cardiovascular risk.

KEYWORDS:

LDL; LDL electronegativity index; atherosclerosis; cardiovascular disease; low-density lipoprotein

PMID:
26357481
PMCID:
PMC4559248
DOI:
10.2147/VHRM.S74697
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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