Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Clin Nutr. 2015 Oct;102(4):897-904. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.115.116863. Epub 2015 Sep 9.

Dietary inflammatory index and telomere length in subjects with a high cardiovascular disease risk from the PREDIMED-NAVARRA study: cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses over 5 y.

Author information

1
Departments of Nutrition, Food Science and Physiology, Navarra Institute for Health Research, Pamplona, Spain;
2
Biochemistry and Genetics, and Navarra Institute for Health Research, Pamplona, Spain;
3
Preventive Medicine and Public Health and Navarra Institute for Health Research, Pamplona, Spain; Center of Biomedical Research in Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBEROBN), Institute of Health Carlos III, Madrid, Spain;
4
Cancer Prevention and Control Program and Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC;
5
Departments of Nutrition, Food Science and Physiology, Centre for Nutrition Research, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain; Navarra Institute for Health Research, Pamplona, Spain; Center of Biomedical Research in Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBEROBN), Institute of Health Carlos III, Madrid, Spain;
6
Center of Biomedical Research in Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBEROBN), Institute of Health Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Cardiovascular Risk and Nutrition Research Group (Regicor Study Group), Barcelona, Spain; and.
7
Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Malaga, Malaga, Spain.
8
Departments of Nutrition, Food Science and Physiology, Navarra Institute for Health Research, Pamplona, Spain; Center of Biomedical Research in Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBEROBN), Institute of Health Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; amarti@unav.es.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Dietary factors can affect telomere length (TL), a biomarker of aging, through oxidation and inflammation-related mechanisms. A Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII) could help to understand the effect of the inflammatory potential of the diet on telomere shortening.

OBJECTIVE:

This study aimed to determine the association of the DII with TL and to examine whether diet-associated inflammation could modify the telomere attrition rate after a 5-y follow-up of a Mediterranean dietary intervention.

DESIGN:

This was a prospective study of 520 participants at high cardiovascular disease risk (mean ± SD age: 67.0 ± 6.0 y, 45% males) from the PREDIMED-NAVARRA (PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea-NAVARRA) trial. Leukocyte TL was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction at baseline and after 5 y of follow-up. The DII was calculated from self-reported data by using a validated 137-item food-frequency questionnaire.

RESULTS:

Longer telomeres at baseline were found in participants who had a more anti-inflammatory diet (lowest DII score) (P-trend = 0.012). Longitudinal analyses further showed that a greater anti-inflammatory potential of the diet (i.e., a decrease in the DII) could significantly slow down the rate of telomere shortening. Moreover, the multivariable-adjusted OR for short telomeres (z score ≤20th percentile) was 1.80 (95% CI: 1.03, 3.17) in a comparison between the highest (proinflammatory) and the lowest (anti-inflammatory) DII tertiles. Similarly, a greater DII (greatest proinflammatory values) after a 5-y follow-up was associated with almost a 2-fold higher risk of accelerated telomere attrition compared with the highest decrease in DII (greatest anti-inflammatory values) during this period (P-trend = 0.025).

CONCLUSIONS:

This study showed both cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between the inflammatory potential of the diet and telomere shortening in subjects with a high cardiovascular disease risk. Our findings are consistent with, but do not show, a beneficial effect of adherence to an anti-inflammatory diet on aging and health by slowing down telomere shortening. These results suggest that diet might play a key role as a determinant of TL through proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory mechanisms. This trial was registered at controlled-trials.com as ISRCTN35739639.

KEYWORDS:

aging; cardiovascular disease; diet; inflammation; telomeres

PMID:
26354530
PMCID:
PMC4588745
DOI:
10.3945/ajcn.115.116863
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center