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Schmerz. 2015 Dec;29(6):604-15. doi: 10.1007/s00482-015-0054-9.

[Generalist palliative care for non-cancer patients: A review article].

[Article in German]

Author information

1
Institut für Allgemeinmedizin, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Carl-Neuberg-Straße 1, Hannover, Deutschland.
2
Institut für Allgemeinmedizin, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Carl-Neuberg-Straße 1, Hannover, Deutschland. Schneider.Nils@MH-Hannover.de.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Most patients in the last phase of life can be treated in the context of generalist palliative care, especially by general practitioners. In contrast to specialized palliative care, non-cancer patients predominate in this setting.

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this article is to review the literature and elaborate current topics for non-cancer patients at the end of life in primary palliative care.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

A literature search was carried out in the databases PubMed and Scopus from 2008 to 2013 followed by a qualitative content analysis according to the PRISMA statement.

RESULTS:

A total of 127 articles could be included in the qualitative content analysis and the final review whereby four core topics were identified: (1) specific target groups (e.g. elderly patients, patients with advanced heart failure and pain), (2) collaboration of general practitioners with other physicians and health professions, (3) qualifications in palliative care and (4) provision of primary palliative care. Most articles found were related to the fourth topic and the subtopic of barriers and facilitators of palliative care. Insufficient coordination of the persons involved was a barrier often discussed. Advanced care planning including concrete aspects of palliative care at an early stage can be beneficial for both patients and professionals.

CONCLUSION:

The current literature search elucidates the importance of optimizing the processes and structures in providing palliative care and the discussion of end of life issues at an early stage in general practice. Therefore, a structured identification of palliative care needs identified by appropriate assessment instruments is crucial.

KEYWORDS:

End of life care; Family practice; General practice; Palliative care; Treatment

PMID:
26351129
DOI:
10.1007/s00482-015-0054-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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