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Int J Clin Pract. 2015 Dec;69(12):1508-16. doi: 10.1111/ijcp.12727. Epub 2015 Sep 8.

Nocturia: risk factors and associated comorbidities; findings from the EpiLUTS study.

Author information

1
Bristol Urological Institute, Southmead Hospital, Bristol, UK.
2
Evidera, Bethesda, MD, USA.
3
The Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, UK.
4
The Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
5
Pfizer Outcomes Research, New York, NY, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the risk factors and comorbidities associated with nocturia in men and women aged ≥ 40 years.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

The EpiLUTS study was an Internet-based cross-sectional, population-representative survey involving 30,000 men and women from the USA, UK and Sweden evaluating lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) using the LUTS Tool. A secondary analysis of the EpiLUTS data using participants with nocturia was performed. Descriptive statistics were used to examine the data. Logistic regressions were used to analyse associations of comorbid conditions and risk factors in men and women with nocturia ≥ 2.

RESULTS:

With a 59% response rate, nocturia ≥ 1 was quite common at 69% in men and 76% in women; 28% men and 34% women had nocturia ≥ 2. Age, body mass index (in women), Hispanic and Black responders, diabetes, high blood pressure, anxiety and depression and a history of bed-wetting were significantly associated with nocturia ≥ 2. Arthritis, asthma, diabetes, heart disease, inflammatory bowel disease, bladder infection, uterine prolapse, hysterectomy and menopausal status were all significantly associated with nocturia ≥ 2 in women. Prostatitis and prostate cancer were significant in men with nocturia ≥ 2. British and Swedish participants had a lesser risk of nocturia ≥ 2.

CONCLUSION:

Nocturia is a highly prevalent condition associated with various risk factors and comorbidities. Treatment of nocturia should be aimed at these causes in a multidisciplinary fashion. Further studies are needed to look specifically at these conditions in the pathophysiology of nocturia.

PMID:
26351086
DOI:
10.1111/ijcp.12727
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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