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CA Cancer J Clin. 2015 Nov-Dec;65(6):428-55. doi: 10.3322/caac.21286. Epub 2015 Sep 8.

American Cancer Society Colorectal Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines.

Author information

1
Assistant Professor of Medicine, The George Washington University, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, DC.
2
Director, Cancer Survivorship Center, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY.
3
Program Manager, National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.
4
Director, Patient-Centered Programs, The George Washington University Cancer Institute, Washington, DC.
5
Director, Performance Improvement, American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA.
6
Director, The George Washington University Cancer Institute, Washington, DC.
7
Behavioral Scientist, Behavioral Research Center/National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.
8
Associate Professor of Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.
9
Assistant Professor, Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine/Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, OH.
10
Associate Professor of Medicine, The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, DC.
11
Vice President, Behavioral Research, Director, Behavioral Research Center, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.
12
Senior Vice President, Patient and Caregiver Support, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.
13
Director, Cancer Control Intervention, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.
14
Vice President, Behavioral Research, South Atlantic Health Systems, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.

Abstract

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and third leading cause of cancer death in both men and women and second leading cause of cancer death when men and women are combined in the United States (US). Almost two-thirds of CRC survivors are living 5 years after diagnosis. Considering the recent decline in both incidence and mortality, the prevalence of CRC survivors is likely to increase dramatically over the coming decades with the increase in rates of CRC screening, further advances in early detection and treatment and the aging and growth of the US population. Survivors are at risk for a CRC recurrence, a new primary CRC, other cancers, as well as both short-term and long-term adverse effects of the CRC and the modalities used to treat it. CRC survivors may also have psychological, reproductive, genetic, social, and employment concerns after treatment. Communication and coordination of care between the treating oncologist and the primary care clinician is critical to effectively and efficiently manage the long-term care of CRC survivors. The guidelines in this article are intended to assist primary care clinicians in delivering risk-based health care for CRC survivors who have completed active therapy.

KEYWORDS:

care coordination; clinical care; colorectal cancer; follow-up; guidelines; late effects; long-term effects; primary care; quality of life; survivorship; survivorship care plan

Summary for patients in

PMID:
26348643
PMCID:
PMC5385892
DOI:
10.3322/caac.21286
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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