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Cell Rep. 2015 Sep 22;12(11):1887-901. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2015.08.028. Epub 2015 Sep 3.

miR-199a Links MeCP2 with mTOR Signaling and Its Dysregulation Leads to Rett Syndrome Phenotypes.

Author information

1
Department of Stem Cell Biology and Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka, Fukuoka 812-8582, Japan; Laboratory of Molecular Neuroscience, Graduate School of Biological Sciences, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0101, Japan.
2
Department of Stem Cell Biology and Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka, Fukuoka 812-8582, Japan.
3
Laboratory of Neural Membrane Biology, Graduate School of Brain Science, Doshisha University, 1-3 Miyakodani, Tatara, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0394, Japan.
4
Plant Global Education Project, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0101, Japan; Department of Bioinformatics, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577, Japan.
5
Plant Global Education Project, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0101, Japan; Institute for Advanced Biosciences, Keio University, Tsuruoka, Yamagata 997-0017, Japan.
6
Department of Mental Retardation and Birth Defect Research, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, 4-1-1 Ogawahigashi, Kodaira, Tokyo 187-8502, Japan.
7
Laboratory of Gene Regulation Research, Graduate School of Biological Sciences, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0101, Japan.
8
Animal Resource Development Unit, RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies, 2-2-3 Minatojima Minami-machi, Chuou-ku, Kobe 650-0047, Japan.
9
Genetic Engineering Team, RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies, 2-2-3 Minatojima Minami-machi, Chuou-ku, Kobe 650-0047, Japan.
10
Department of Stem Cell Biology and Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka, Fukuoka 812-8582, Japan; Laboratory of Molecular Neuroscience, Graduate School of Biological Sciences, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0101, Japan. Electronic address: kin1@scb.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp.

Abstract

Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by MECP2 mutations. Although emerging evidence suggests that MeCP2 deficiency is associated with dysregulation of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), which functions as a hub for various signaling pathways, the mechanism underlying this association and the molecular pathophysiology of RTT remain elusive. We show here that MeCP2 promotes the posttranscriptional processing of particular microRNAs (miRNAs) as a component of the microprocessor Drosha complex. Among the MeCP2-regulated miRNAs, we found that miR-199a positively controls mTOR signaling by targeting inhibitors for mTOR signaling. miR-199a and its targets have opposite effects on mTOR activity, ameliorating and inducing RTT neuronal phenotypes, respectively. Furthermore, genetic deletion of miR-199a-2 led to a reduction of mTOR activity in the brain and recapitulated numerous RTT phenotypes in mice. Together, these findings establish miR-199a as a critical downstream target of MeCP2 in RTT pathogenesis by linking MeCP2 with mTOR signaling.

PMID:
26344767
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2015.08.028
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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