Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2015 Nov-Dec;52(Pt B):143-50. doi: 10.1016/j.ntt.2015.08.009. Epub 2015 Sep 5.

Prenatal exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers and child attention problems at 3-7 years.

Author information

1
Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA.
2
Institute of Human Nutrition, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA.
3
Division of Laboratory Sciences, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA.
4
Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address: jh2678@cumc.columbia.edu.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) comprise a class of halogenated compounds used extensively as flame retardant chemicals in consumer products resulting in nearly ubiquitous human exposure. Mounting evidence suggests that PBDEs are developmental neurotoxicants; however, associations between early life exposure and child behavior have been largely limited to a single developmental time point.

METHODS:

The study population consists primarily of white, black and Chinese women who were pregnant on 11 September 2001 and delivered at 1 of 3 downtown New York City hospitals. Maternal-child pairs were followed through age 7 years. Cord blood was collected at delivery and PBDE plasma levels for 210 samples were analyzed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Child Behavior Checklist, a validated maternal-report instrument used for assessing child behavior, was administered annually between the ages of 3 and 7 years. We analyzed the association between natural log-transformed and dichotomized (low vs. high) PBDEs and attention problems using multivariable adjusted negative binomial regression.

RESULTS:

We detected 4 PBDE congeners in more than 50% of samples, with concentrations highest for BDE-47 (median±IQR: 11.2±19.6 ng/g). In adjusted analyses, we detected associations between BDE-47 (1.21, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.47), and BDE-153 (1.18, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.39) in cord plasma and increased attention problems among children at age 4 (n=109) but not 6 (n=107) years.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings demonstrate a positive trend between prenatal PBDE exposure and early childhood attention problems, and are consistent with previous research reporting associations between prenatal PBDE exposure and disrupted child behaviors.

KEYWORDS:

Attention; Flame retardants; Neurodevelopment; PBDEs; Prenatal

PMID:
26344673
PMCID:
PMC4785171
DOI:
10.1016/j.ntt.2015.08.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center