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Vaccines (Basel). 2014 May 14;2(2):354-79. doi: 10.3390/vaccines2020354.

HIV DNA Vaccine: Stepwise Improvements Make a Difference.

Author information

1
Human Retrovirus Pathogenesis Section, Vaccine Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute at Frederick, P.O. Box B, Frederick, MD 21702, USA. barbara.felber@nih.gov.
2
Human Retrovirus Section, Vaccine Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute at Frederick, P.O. Box B, Frederick, MD 21702, USA. antonio.valentin@nih.gov.
3
Human Retrovirus Section, Vaccine Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute at Frederick, P.O. Box B, Frederick, MD 21702, USA. margherita.rosati@nih.gov.
4
Human Retrovirus Pathogenesis Section, Vaccine Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute at Frederick, P.O. Box B, Frederick, MD 21702, USA. cristina.bergamaschi@nih.gov.
5
Human Retrovirus Section, Vaccine Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute at Frederick, P.O. Box B, Frederick, MD 21702, USA. george.pavlakis@nih.gov.

Abstract

Inefficient DNA delivery methods and low expression of plasmid DNA have been major obstacles for the use of plasmid DNA as vaccine for HIV/AIDS. This review describes successful efforts to improve DNA vaccine methodology over the past ~30 years. DNA vaccination, either alone or in combination with other methods, has the potential to be a rapid, safe, and effective vaccine platform against AIDS. Recent clinical trials suggest the feasibility of its translation to the clinic.

KEYWORDS:

DNA delivery; DNA expression; cytokine; electroporation; immunogenicity; macaque; plasmid; vaccination

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