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BJOG. 2016 May;123(6):900-9. doi: 10.1111/1471-0528.13525. Epub 2015 Sep 6.

Alcohol use and self-perceived mental health status among pregnant and breastfeeding women in Canada: a secondary data analysis.

Lange S1,2, Quere M3, Shield K1,2, Rehm J1,2,4,5, Popova S1,2,4,6.

Author information

1
Social and Epidemiological Research Department, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, Canada.
2
Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Faculty of Medicine, Toronto, ON, Canada.
3
Institut de Santé Publique d'Épidémiologie et de Développement, l'Université Bordeaux Segalen, Bordeaux Cedex, France.
4
Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
5
Epidemiological Research Unit, Klinische Psychologie and Psychotherapie, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
6
Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto, ON, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To estimate the prevalence of alcohol consumption during pregnancy and while breastfeeding in Canada from 2003 to 2010, and to test the relation between self-perceived mental health status and alcohol consumption during pregnancy and while breastfeeding.

DESIGN:

Secondary analysis of four cycles of the Canadian Community Health Survey, a population-based cross-sectional survey.

SETTING:

Canada.

SAMPLE:

A total of 18 612 pregnant and 15 836 breastfeeding women.

METHODS:

The prevalence of alcohol consumption during pregnancy and while breastfeeding and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by province and territory, and cycle. The relation between self-perceived mental health status and alcohol consumption during pregnancy and while breastfeeding was explored using quasi-Poisson regression models.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Alcohol consumption during pregnancy and while breastfeeding, and self-perceived mental health status.

RESULTS:

In Canada, between 2003 and 2010, approximately one in every ten pregnant women (9.9%; 95%CI 9.2-10.5%) and two in every ten breastfeeding women (20.3%; 95%CI 19.4-21.2%) women consumed alcohol. Women with a lower self-perceived mental health status (i.e. 'good') were 1.40 (95%CI 1.18-1.67, P < 0.001) times more likely to have consumed alcohol during pregnancy, compared with women with an 'excellent' self-perceived mental health. There were no notable differences between the categories of mental health status in regard to alcohol consumption while breastfeeding.

CONCLUSION:

Despite public health efforts in Canada, a significant proportion of pregnant and breastfeeding women consume alcohol. It is imperative that a standard screening protocol be initiated among pregnant and breastfeeding women, especially in high-risk populations (e.g. women utilising substance abuse treatment programs).

TWEETABLE ABSTRACT:

In Canada in 2003-2010, approximately 10% of pregnant and 20% of breastfeeding women consumed alcohol.

KEYWORDS:

Alcohol use; Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder; breastfeeding; mental health; pregnancy; prevalence

PMID:
26344418
DOI:
10.1111/1471-0528.13525
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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