Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Carbohydr Polym. 2015 Nov 20;133:644-53. doi: 10.1016/j.carbpol.2015.07.024. Epub 2015 Jul 13.

Films based on oxidized starch and cellulose from barley.

Author information

1
Departamento de Ciência e Tecnologia Agroindustrial, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Pelotas 96010-900, RS, Brazil. Electronic address: shanisemell@hotmail.com.
2
Departamento de Ciência e Tecnologia Agroindustrial, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Pelotas 96010-900, RS, Brazil.
3
Centro de Desenvolvimento Tecnológico, Engenharia de Materiais, Universidade federal de Pelotas, Pelotas 96010-900, RS, Brazil.

Abstract

Starch and cellulose fibers were isolated from grains and the husk from barley, respectively. Biodegradable films of native starch or oxidized starches and glycerol with different concentrations of cellulose fibers (0%, 10% and 20%) were prepared. The films were characterized by morphological, mechanical, barrier, and thermal properties. Cellulose fibers isolated from the barley husk were obtained with 75% purity and high crystallinity. The morphology of the films of the oxidized starches, regardless of the fiber addition, was more homogeneous as compared to the film of the native starch. The addition of cellulose fibers in the films increased the tensile strength and decreased elongation. The water vapor permeability of the film of oxidized starch with 20% of cellulose fibers was lower than the without fibers. However the films with cellulose fibers had the highest decomposition with the initial temperature and thermal stability. The oxidized starch and cellulose fibers from barley have a good potential for use in packaging. The addition of cellulose fibers in starch films can contribute to the development of films more resistant that can be applied in food systems to maintain its integrity.

KEYWORDS:

Barley husk; Oxidation; Tensile strength; Thermal stability; Water vapor permeability

PMID:
26344323
DOI:
10.1016/j.carbpol.2015.07.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center