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J Community Health. 2016 Apr;41(2):244-9. doi: 10.1007/s10900-015-0088-z.

Differences in African-American Maternal Self-Efficacy Regarding Practices Impacting Risk for Sudden Infant Death.

Author information

1
Division of General Pediatrics and Community Health, Children's National Medical Center, 111 Michigan Avenue NW, Washington, DC, 20010, USA.
2
Children's National Medical Center, Children's Research Institute, Washington, DC, USA.
3
Department of Pediatrics, George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, DC, USA.
4
Division of General Pediatrics and Community Health, Children's National Medical Center, 111 Michigan Avenue NW, Washington, DC, 20010, USA. rmoon@cnmc.org.
5
Department of Pediatrics, George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, DC, USA. rmoon@cnmc.org.

Abstract

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and other sleep-related deaths, including accidental suffocation, account for ~4000 US deaths annually. Parents may have higher self-efficacy with regards to preventing accidental suffocation than SIDS. The objective of this study was to assess self-efficacy in African-American mothers with regards to safe sleep practices and risk for SIDS and accidental suffocation. As part of randomized clinical trial in African-American mothers of newborn infants, mothers completed a baseline survey about knowledge of and attitudes towards safe sleep recommendations, current intent, self-efficacy, and demographics. Tabular and adjusted, regression-based analyses of these cross-sectional data evaluated the impact of the message target (SIDS risk reduction vs. suffocation prevention) on perceived self-efficacy. 1194 mothers were interviewed. Mean infant age was 1.5 days. 90.8 % of mothers planned to place their infant supine, 96.7 % stated that their infant would sleep in the same room, 3.6 % planned to bedshare with the infant, and 72.9 % intended to have soft bedding in the crib. Mothers were more likely to believe that prone placement (70.9 vs. 50.5 %, p < 0.001), bedsharing (73.5 vs. 50.1 %, p < 0.001), and having soft bedding in the sleep area (78.3 vs. 59.5 %, p < 0.001) increased their infant's risk for suffocation than it did for SIDS. Mothers had higher self-efficacy, viz. increased confidence that their actions could keep their infant safe, with regards to suffocation than SIDS (88.0 vs. 79.4 %, p < 0.001). These differences remained significant when controlled for sociodemographics, grandmother in home, number of people in home, and breastfeeding intention. Maternal self-efficacy is higher with regards to prevention of accidental suffocation in African-Americans, regardless of sociodemographics. Healthcare professionals should discuss both SIDS risk reduction and prevention of accidental suffocation when advising African-American parents about safe sleep practices.

KEYWORDS:

African–American; Disparity; SIDS; Self-efficacy; Suffocation

PMID:
26342946
PMCID:
PMC4779415
DOI:
10.1007/s10900-015-0088-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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