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J Biomech. 2015 Oct 15;48(13):3728-31. doi: 10.1016/j.jbiomech.2015.08.019. Epub 2015 Aug 28.

Novel technique for evaluation of knee function continuously through the range of flexion.

Author information

1
Orthopaedic Robotics Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15219, USA; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Kaufman Building Suite 1011, 3471 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA.
2
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Kaufman Building Suite 1011, 3471 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA.
3
Orthopaedic Robotics Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15219, USA; Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, 302 Benedum Hall, 3700O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA. Electronic address: genesis1@pitt.edu.

Abstract

Previous research has utilized robots to examine joint kinematics and in situ forces in response to loads applied at discrete flexion angles (static method). Recently, studies have applied loads continuously throughout flexion (continuous flexion method). However, the joint kinematics resulting from each of these methods have not been directly compared. Therefore, the objective of this study was to utilize a robotic testing system to compare kinematics and in situ forces of porcine knees in response to 89 N of anterior tibial load and 4 Nm of internal tibial torque between the static method (loads applied at 30°, 45°, 60°, and 75° of flexion) and the continuous flexion method (measured continuously from 30-75° of flexion) for both the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) intact and ACL deficient (ACLD) knees. When anterior tibial load was applied the average differences in anterior tibial translation between the two methods for the intact state was 0.5±0.0 mm and for the ACLD state was 0.3±0.2 mm. The difference in the in situ forces in the ACL was 1.6±0.9 N. When internal tibial torque was applied the average differences in the resultant internal tibial rotation for the intact state was 0.9±0.4° and for the ACLD state was 1.0±0.5°. The difference in the in situ forces in the ACL was 3.3±2.0 N. Both methods are equally efficient in detecting significant differences (p<0.05) between intact and ACL deficient knee states. The continuous flexion method was also shown to be more efficient than the static method and provides continuous data on knee function throughout the range of motion.

KEYWORDS:

ACL; Biomechanics; Knee; Robot; Robotics

PMID:
26342768
DOI:
10.1016/j.jbiomech.2015.08.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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