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Alzheimers Dement. 2016 Feb;12(2):100-109. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2015.08.002. Epub 2015 Sep 3.

Prudent diet may attenuate the adverse effects of Western diet on cognitive decline.

Author information

1
Aging Research Center, Center for Alzheimer Research, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: behnaz.shakersain@ki.se.
2
Aging Research Center, Center for Alzheimer Research, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
3
Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
4
Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
5
Aging Research Center, Center for Alzheimer Research, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, Stockholm, Sweden.
6
Aging Research Center, Center for Alzheimer Research, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, China. Electronic address: weili.xu@ki.se.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The influence of mixed dietary patterns on cognitive changes is unknown.

METHODS:

A total of 2223 dementia-free participants aged ≥60 were followed up for 6 years to examine the impact of dietary patterns on cognitive decline. Mini-mental state examination (MMSE) was administered. Diet was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire. By factor analysis, Western and prudent dietary patterns emerged. Mixed-effect models for longitudinal data with repeated measurements were used.

RESULTS:

Compared with the lowest adherence to each pattern, the highest adherence to prudent pattern was related to less MMSE decline (β = 0.106, P = .011), whereas the highest adherence to Western pattern was associated with more MMSE decline (β = -0.156, P < .001). The decline associated with Western diet was attenuated when accompanied by high adherence to prudent pattern.

DISCUSSION:

High adherence to prudent diet may diminish the adverse effects of high adherence to Western diet on cognitive decline.

KEYWORDS:

Cognitive decline; Dietary patterns; Longitudinal study; Population-based

PMID:
26342761
DOI:
10.1016/j.jalz.2015.08.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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