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BMC Cancer. 2015 Sep 4;15:618. doi: 10.1186/s12885-015-1628-8.

Exploring research participation among cancer patients: analysis of a national survey and an in-depth interview study.

Author information

1
Patient Experience Research Centre, Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St. Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, Paddington, London, W2 1PG, UK. louise.mc-grath-lone@imperial.ac.uk.
2
Patient Experience Research Centre, Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St. Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, Paddington, London, W2 1PG, UK. s.day@imperial.ac.uk.
3
Patient Experience Research Centre, Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St. Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, Paddington, London, W2 1PG, UK. c.schoenborn@imperial.ac.uk.
4
Patient Experience Research Centre, Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St. Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, Paddington, London, W2 1PG, UK. h.ward@imperial.ac.uk.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Inequalities in cancer research participation are thought to exist with certain groups under-represented in research populations; however, much of the evidence is based on small-scale studies. The aim of this study was to explore data from in-depth interviews with cancer patients and a large national survey to investigate variation in who is asked to participate in research and who takes part.

METHODS:

Factors associated with research discussion and participation were explored in National Cancer Patient Experience Survey data using multivariate logistic regression and during in-depth interviews with 25 breast cancer patients.

RESULTS:

Survey data were available for 66,953 cancer patients; 30.4% reported having discussions about, and 18.9% took part in, research. Barriers to participation at staff, patient and trust level were evident; for example, staff were less likely to discuss research with older patients, Asian and black patients were less likely to take part and patients treated at specialist or teaching trusts had higher levels of discussion and participation. Interviews showed that patients' willingness to participate changed over time and was not synonymous with participation as some were ineligible.

CONCLUSION:

Some patient groups were less likely to have discussions about or participate in research. Analysis of this variation vis-à-vis the composition of the patient population may be useful to ensure that there is equity regarding the potential benefits of research participation and that research findings are applicable to target populations in the translational model.

PMID:
26341736
PMCID:
PMC4560870
DOI:
10.1186/s12885-015-1628-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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