Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Curr Environ Health Rep. 2015 Dec;2(4):367-78. doi: 10.1007/s40572-015-0064-x.

Cumulative Chemical Exposures During Pregnancy and Early Development.

Author information

1
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University, 950 New Hampshire Avenue NW, Suite 414, Washington, DC, 20052, USA. smitro@gwu.edu.
2
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University, 950 New Hampshire Avenue NW, Suite 414, Washington, DC, 20052, USA. ttj14@gwu.edu.
3
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University, 950 New Hampshire Avenue NW, Suite 414, Washington, DC, 20052, USA. azota@gwu.edu.

Abstract

Industrial and consumer product chemicals are widely used, leading to ubiquitous human exposure to the most common classes. Because these chemicals may affect developmental milestones, exposures in pregnant women and developing fetuses are of particular interest. In this review, we discuss the prevalence of chemical exposures in pregnant women, the chemical class-specific relationships between maternal and fetal exposures, and the major sources of exposures for six chemical classes of concern: phthalates, phenols, perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), flame retardants, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and organochlorine pesticides (OCs). Additionally, we describe the current efforts to characterize cumulative exposures to synthetic chemicals during pregnancy. We conclude by highlighting gaps in the literature and discussing possible applications of the findings to reduce the prevalence of cumulative exposures during pregnancy.

KEYWORDS:

Cumulative exposure; Flame retardants; Organochlorine pesticides; Perfluorinated compounds; Phenols; Phthalates; Polychlorinated biphenyls; Pregnancy

PMID:
26341623
PMCID:
PMC4626367
DOI:
10.1007/s40572-015-0064-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center