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Heart Rhythm. 2016 Jan;13(1):62-9. doi: 10.1016/j.hrthm.2015.09.001. Epub 2015 Sep 1.

Quality of life after videoscopic left cardiac sympathetic denervation in patients with potentially life-threatening cardiac channelopathies/cardiomyopathies.

Author information

1
Department of General Surgery, Division of Pediatric Surgery.
2
Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Division of Pediatric Cardiology; Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Diseases; Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Windland Smith Rice Sudden Death Genomics Laboratory.
3
Mayo Medical School, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.
4
Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Division of Pediatric Cardiology.
5
Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Division of Pediatric Cardiology; Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Diseases; Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Windland Smith Rice Sudden Death Genomics Laboratory,. Electronic address: ackerman.michael@mayo.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Left cardiac sympathetic denervation (LCSD) provides an additive or potentially alternative treatment option for patients with life-threatening cardiac channelopathies/cardiomyopathies.

OBJECTIVE:

We sought to examine the effects of LCSD on quality of life (QOL).

METHODS:

From November 2005 to May 2013, 109 patients who underwent LCSD were subsequently sent postoperative QOL surveys.

RESULTS:

Of 109 patients, 8 (7%) could not be contacted. Of the remaining 101 patients, 62 returned surveys (response rate 61%). There were an average of 4.1 ± 1.8 self-reported side effects immediately after LCSD. The most common anticipated side effects included unilateral hand dryness, color or temperature variance between sides of the face, and abnormal sweating. Although parent-reported pediatric physical QOL scores were lower than national norms, there were no differences in psychosocial QOL or disability scores (P = .09 and .33, respectively). QOL scores for adult patients were not significantly different from a US normative sample. Adult LCSD patients reported less disability than a US normative sample (P < .01). There was no correlation between QOL scores and the presence of anticipated side effects. However, among the subset of pediatric patients who continued to receive ventricular fibrillation-terminating implantable cardioverter-defibrillator shocks after LCSD, there was a correlation between their disability scores and the number of reported shocks (Spearman correlation = 0.56). The majority of patients/parents reported that they were very or somewhat satisfied with their surgery (or their child's surgery) and would definitely or probably recommend LCSD to another patient.

CONCLUSION:

Despite the anticipated side effects associated with LCSD, patients are satisfied with their surgery and indicate that they would recommend the surgery to another patient.

KEYWORDS:

CPVT; Left cardiac sympathetic denervation; Long QT syndrome; Quality of life; Sudden cardiac death

PMID:
26341607
DOI:
10.1016/j.hrthm.2015.09.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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