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Semin Perinatol. 2015 Oct;39(6):483-7. doi: 10.1053/j.semperi.2015.07.013. Epub 2015 Sep 2.

Failed induction of labor.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sidney Kimmel Medical School at Thomas Jefferson University, 833 Chestnut St, 1st floor, Philadelphia, PA 19107; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Christiana Care Hospital, Newark, DE. Electronic address: Corina.Schoen@jefferson.edu.
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sidney Kimmel Medical School at Thomas Jefferson University, 833 Chestnut St, 1st floor, Philadelphia, PA 19107; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Christiana Care Hospital, Newark, DE.

Abstract

Induction of labor will affect almost a quarter of all pregnancies, but historically there has been no generally accepted definition of failed induction of labor. Only recently have studies analyzed the lengths of latent labor that are associated with successful labor induction ending in a vaginal delivery, and recommendations for uniformity in the diagnosis of failed induction have largely resulted from this data. This review assesses the most recent and inclusive definition for failed induction, risk factors associated with failure, complications, and special populations that may be at risk for a failed induction.

KEYWORDS:

cervical ripening; cesarean delivery; labor induction

PMID:
26341068
DOI:
10.1053/j.semperi.2015.07.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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