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Genome Biol Evol. 2015 Sep 2;7(9):2623-34. doi: 10.1093/gbe/evv169.

Genomic Analysis of an Ascomycete Fungus from the Rice Planthopper Reveals How It Adapts to an Endosymbiotic Lifestyle.

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory of Rice Biology and Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Agricultural Entomology, Institute of Insect Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.
2
National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Tsukuba, Japan.
3
BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China.
4
State Key Laboratory of Rice Biology and Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Agricultural Entomology, Institute of Insect Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China chxzhang@zju.edu.cn.

Abstract

A number of sap-sucking insects harbor endosymbionts, which are thought to play an important role in the development of their hosts. One of the most important rice pests, the brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens (Stål), harbors an obligatory yeast-like symbiont (YLS) that cannot be cultured in vitro. Genomic information on this YLS would be useful to better understand its evolution. In this study, we performed genome sequencing of the YLS using both 454 and Illumina approaches, generating a draft genome that shows a slightly smaller genome size and relatively higher GC content than most ascomycete fungi. A phylogenomic analysis of the YLS supported its close relationship with insect pathogens. We analyzed YLS-specific genes and the categories of genes that are likely to have changed in the YLS during its evolution. The loss of mating type locus demonstrated in the YLS sheds light on the evolution of eukaryotic symbionts. This information about the YLS genome provides a helpful guide for further understanding endosymbiotic associations in hemiptera and the symbiotic replacement of ancient bacteria with a multifunctional YLS seems to have been a successful change.

KEYWORDS:

Ascomycete; Entomomyces delphacidicola; Nilaparvata lugens; endosymbiosis; evolution; yeast-like symbiont

PMID:
26338189
PMCID:
PMC4607526
DOI:
10.1093/gbe/evv169
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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