Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Brain Struct Funct. 2016 Jul;221(6):3237-58. doi: 10.1007/s00429-015-1098-4. Epub 2015 Sep 3.

Large-scale intrinsic functional network organization along the long axis of the human medial temporal lobe.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Rd, Stanford, CA, 94304, USA. szqin@stanford.edu.
2
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Rd, Stanford, CA, 94304, USA.
3
Key Laboratory for Neuroinformation, School of Life Science and Technology, University of Electronic Science and Technology, Chengdu, People's Republic of China.
4
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Rd, Stanford, CA, 94304, USA. menon@stanford.edu.
5
Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA. menon@stanford.edu.
6
Stanford Neuroscience Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA. menon@stanford.edu.

Abstract

The medial temporal lobe (MTL), encompassing the hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus (PHG), is a heterogeneous structure which plays a critical role in memory and cognition. Here, we investigate functional architecture of the human MTL along the long axis of the hippocampus and PHG. The hippocampus showed stronger connectivity with striatum, ventral tegmental area and amygdala-regions important for integrating reward and affective signals, whereas the PHG showed stronger connectivity with unimodal and polymodal association cortices. In the hippocampus, the anterior node showed stronger connectivity with the anterior medial temporal lobe and the posterior node showed stronger connectivity with widely distributed cortical and subcortical regions including those involved in sensory and reward processing. In the PHG, differences were characterized by a gradient of increasing anterior-to-posterior connectivity with core nodes of the default mode network. Left and right MTL connectivity patterns were remarkably similar, except for stronger left than right MTL connectivity with regions in the left MTL, the ventral striatum and default mode network. Graph theoretical analysis of MTL-based networks revealed higher node centrality of the posterior, compared to anterior and middle hippocampus. The PHG showed prominent gradients in both node degree and centrality along its anterior-to-posterior axis. Our findings highlight several novel aspects of functional heterogeneity in connectivity along the long axis of the human MTL and provide new insights into how its network organization supports integration and segregation of signals from distributed brain areas. The implications of our findings for a principledunderstanding of distributed pathways that support memory and cognition are discussed.

KEYWORDS:

Connectivity; Hippocampus; Medial temporal lobe; Memory; Network; fMRI

PMID:
26336951
PMCID:
PMC4777679
DOI:
10.1007/s00429-015-1098-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center