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Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016 Mar;51(3):258-66. doi: 10.1002/ppul.23303. Epub 2015 Sep 3.

Feasibility of spirometry testing in preschool children.

Author information

1
School of Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA), San Antonio, Texas.
2
Department of Pediatrics, UTHSCSA, San Antonio, Texas.
3
Department of General Internal Medicine, University of Washington, Washington.

Abstract

RATIONALE:

The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of obtaining acceptable and reproducible spirometry data in preschool aged children (3-5 years) by technicians without prior experience with spirometry.

METHODS:

Two technicians were trained to perform spirometry testing (ndd Easy on-PC) and to administer standardized questionnaires. Preschool aged children were enrolled from two Head Start centers and a local primary care clinic. Subjects were trained in proper spirometry technique and tested until at least two acceptable efforts were obtained or the subject no longer produced acceptable efforts.

RESULTS:

200 subjects were enrolled: mean age 4.0 years (± 0.7 SD); age distribution: 51 (25.5%) 3 years old, 103 (51.5%) 4 years old, and 46 (23%) 5 years old. Fifty-six percent male and 75% Hispanic. One hundred thirty (65%) subjects produced at least one acceptable effort on their first visit: 23 (45%) for 3 years old, 67 (65%) for 4 years old, and 40 (87%) for 5 years old. The number of acceptable efforts correlated with age (r = 0.29, P < 0.001) but not gender. The mean number of acceptable efforts on the first visit was 2.66 (± 2.54 SD; range 0-10). One hundred twenty subjects (60%) had two acceptable efforts; 102 had FEV0.5 within 10% or 0.1 L and 104 had FVC within 10% or 0.1 L of best effort. The Asthma Health Screening Survey (AHSS) was 78% sensitive when compared to a specialist exam and 86% compared to a self-reported prior diagnosis of asthma.

CONCLUSIONS:

Technicians without prior experience were able to obtain acceptable and reproducible spirometry results from the preschool aged children; the number of acceptable efforts correlated significantly with age.

KEYWORDS:

asthma/pp (physiopathology); child; feasibility studies; pulmonary ventilation; respiratory function tests

PMID:
26336077
DOI:
10.1002/ppul.23303
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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