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Meat Sci. 2016 Jan;111:47-52. doi: 10.1016/j.meatsci.2015.08.014. Epub 2015 Aug 29.

Effectiveness of a 95 SNP panel for the screening of breed label fraud in the Chinese meat market.

Author information

1
IGEVET - Instituto de Genética Veterinaria (UNLP-CONICET LA PLATA), Facultad de Ciencias Veterinarias, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata, Argentina; Departamento de Producción Animal, Facultad de Agronomía, Universidad de Buenos AiresArgentina.
2
Key Laboratory of Agro-Products Processing and Quality Control, Ministry of Agriculture, Institute of Agro-Products Processing Science and Technology, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 5109, Beijing 100193, P.R. of China.
3
IGEVET - Instituto de Genética Veterinaria (UNLP-CONICET LA PLATA), Facultad de Ciencias Veterinarias, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata, Argentina.
4
Cátedra de Zootecnia, Departamento de Producción Animal, Facultad de Ciencias Veterinarias, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata, Argentina.
5
IGEVET - Instituto de Genética Veterinaria (UNLP-CONICET LA PLATA), Facultad de Ciencias Veterinarias, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata, Argentina. Electronic address: ggiovam@fcv.unlp.edu.ar.

Abstract

Breed assignment has proved to be useful to control meat trade and protect the value of special productions. Meat-related frauds have been detected in China; therefore, 95 SNPs selected from the ISAG core panel were evaluated to develop an automated and technologically updated tool to screen breed label fraud in the Chinese meat market. A total of 271 animals from four Chinese yellow cattle (CYC) populations, six Bos taurus breeds, two Bos indicus and one composite were used. The allocation test distinguished European, Japanese and Zebu breeds, and two Chinese genetic components. It correctly allocated Japanese Black, Zebu and British breeds in 100, 90 and 89% of samples, respectively. CYC evidenced the Zebu, Holstein and Limousin introgression. The test did not detect CYC components in any of the 25 samples from Argentinean butchers. The method could be useful to certify Angus, Hereford and Japanese Black meat, but a modification in the panel would be needed to differentiate other breeds.

KEYWORDS:

Breed; China; DNA; Fraud; Label; Meat

PMID:
26334371
DOI:
10.1016/j.meatsci.2015.08.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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