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Nutr Cancer. 2015;67(7):1083-92. doi: 10.1080/01635581.2015.1073754. Epub 2015 Sep 2.

Antioxidant and Anticoagulant Status Were Improved by Personalized Dietary Intervention Based on Biochemical and Clinical Parameters in Cancer Patients.

Lee GY1,2, Lee JJ3, Lee SM1,4.

Author information

1
a Program of Clinical Nutrition , Yonsei Graduate School of Human Environmental Sciences , Seoul , South Korea.
2
b Holon Integrative Cancer Center , Seoul Song Do Colorectal Hospital , Seoul , South Korea.
3
c Department of Surgery , Seoul Song Do Colorectal Hospital , Seoul , South Korea.
4
d Department of Food and Nutrition, College of Human Ecology , Yonsei University , Seoul , South Korea.

Abstract

We investigated whether personalized dietary intervention could improve clinical measurements such as immune cell-mediated cytotoxicity, serum albumin, derivatives of reactive oxygen metabolites (D-ROMS), D-dimer, and fibrinogen. Cancer patients received either a treatment support diet (TD, for those with chemotherapy), or a remission support diet (RD; for those in remission) for at least 3 wk (21-61 days). Both diets were low glycemic, low fat, and high plant protein diets; the diet for the TD group contained an additional 0.5 servings of protein. Based on clinical values, additional amounts of garlic, onion, tomato, shiitake, rice bran, kale, blueberry, pineapples, and/or turmeric powder were provided in regular meals. Estimated daily intake of protein, plant fat, garlic, onion, allicin, and quercetin was greater in the TD compared to the RD. An increased intake of vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E and selenium and a reduction in D-dimer were noted compared to baseline diets in both groups. A decrease in D-ROMS in the RD and an increase in albumin and an increased tendency in cytotoxicity in the TD were observed. In conclusion, personalized diets with supplemented functional ingredients improved antioxidant status and/or anticoagulant activity in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy and in remission.

PMID:
26333154
DOI:
10.1080/01635581.2015.1073754
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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