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Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2016 May;23(7):683-93. doi: 10.1177/2047487315604311. Epub 2015 Sep 1.

Predictors of exercise capacity following exercise-based rehabilitation in patients with coronary heart disease and heart failure: A meta-regression analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Cardiac Surgery, Ibrahim Cardiac Hospital & Research Institute, Bangladesh National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
2
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
3
Department of Cardiology, Vejle Hospital, Vejle, Denmark.
4
Non-communicable Disease Unit, World Health Organization (WHO), Country office for Bangladesh, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
5
Department of Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy, Holbaek Hospital, Denmark.
6
The Heart Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark CopenRehab, Section of Social Medicine, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Denmark Bachelor's Degree Programme in Physiotherapy, Dept. of Rehabilitation and Nutrition, Faculty of Health and Technology, Metropolitan University College, Copenhagen, Denmark.
7
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark Institute of Health Research, University of Exeter Medical School, Exeter, UK r.taylor@exeter.ac.uk.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The aim of this study was to undertake a comprehensive assessment of the patient, intervention and trial-level factors that may predict exercise capacity following exercise-based rehabilitation in patients with coronary heart disease and heart failure.

DESIGN:

Meta-analysis and meta-regression analysis.

METHODS:

Randomized controlled trials of exercise-based rehabilitation were identified from three published systematic reviews. Exercise capacity was pooled across trials using random effects meta-analysis, and meta-regression used to examine the association between exercise capacity and a range of patient (e.g. age), intervention (e.g. exercise frequency) and trial (e.g. risk of bias) factors.

RESULTS:

55 trials (61 exercise-control comparisons, 7553 patients) were included. Following exercise-based rehabilitation compared to control, overall exercise capacity was on average 0.95 (95% CI: 0.76-1.41) standard deviation units higher, and in trials reporting maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max) was 3.3 ml/kg.min(-1) (95% CI: 2.6-4.0) higher. There was evidence of a high level of statistical heterogeneity across trials (I(2) statistic > 50%). In multivariable meta-regression analysis, only exercise intervention intensity was found to be significantly associated with VO2max (P = 0.04); those trials with the highest average exercise intensity had the largest mean post-rehabilitation VO2max compared to control.

CONCLUSIONS:

We found considerable heterogeneity across randomized controlled trials in the magnitude of improvement in exercise capacity following exercise-based rehabilitation compared to control among patients with coronary heart disease or heart failure. Whilst higher exercise intensities were associated with a greater level of post-rehabilitation exercise capacity, there was no strong evidence to support other intervention, patient or trial factors to be predictive.

KEYWORDS:

Exercise training; cardiac rehabilitation; coronary heart disease; exercise capacity; heart failure; meta-analysis

PMID:
26330205
DOI:
10.1177/2047487315604311
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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