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J Mol Cell Cardiol. 1989 Dec;21(12):1349-53.

Enzyme linked immuno assay of cardiac troponin T for the detection of acute myocardial infarction in patients.

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1
Innere Medizin III, University of Heidelberg, FRG.

Abstract

For the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in patients circulating constituents of the contractile apparatus may be measured instead of cytosolic cardiac enzymes. The potential advantages of the use of myofibrillar cardiac proteins as marker proteins for AMI results from their expression as cardio-specific isoforms, their high intracellular concentration, and their continuous release from infarcting myocardium. While analyzing the specificity of polyclonal goat anti-human cardiac myosin light chains antisera a cardio-specific antibody fraction was identified which is directed against cardiac troponin T contaminations of the myosin light chains antigen. Using this antibody fraction a standardized enzyme immuno-assay for circulating troponin T was developed to detect AMI in patients. In this assay troponin T is bound on different epitopes by affinity purified goat anti-cardiac troponin T antibodies immobilized on polyvinyl chloride test tubes as well as horse raddish peroxidase labeled monoclonal anti-troponin T antibody in liquid phase. The assay procedure can be completed semiautomatically in 90 min with a detection limit of the assay of 0.5 ng/ml human or bovine cardiac troponin T. There is 1% crossreactivity with skeletal troponin T. In 26 healthy volunteers no cardiac troponin T was detectable in serum of 25 persons, while in 1 further volunteer 1 ng/ml troponin T was found. In the sera of all 50 patients with transmural AMI troponin T was elevated ranging from 7.2 to 110 ng/ml. In the mean troponin T remained elevated from three until 300 hours after onset of ischemic pain showing a biphasic serum concentration curve.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

PMID:
2632816
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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