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Nutr Cancer. 2015;67(7):1113-9. doi: 10.1080/01635581.2015.1073756. Epub 2015 Sep 1.

Effects of Pomegranate Juice on Hormonal Biomarkers of Breast Cancer Risk.

Author information

1
a Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Health Sciences , University of Massachusetts , Amherst , Massachusetts , USA.
2
b Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health and Health Sciences , University of Massachusetts , Amherst , Massachusetts , USA.
3
c Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology , Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine , Chicago , Illinois , USA.
4
d Department of Epidemiology and Public Health , University of Maryland School of Medicine , Baltimore , Maryland , USA.
5
e Department of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences , College of Pharmacy, University of Rhode Island , Kingston , Rhode Island , USA.

Abstract

Pomegranate is a rich source of polyphenols. Laboratory studies suggest polyphenols may exert breast cancer preventive effects through modulation of endogenous sex hormone levels. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of pomegranate juice consumption on serum levels of estradiol, estrone, testosterone, androstenedione, and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). Sixty-four healthy postmenopausal women were randomly assigned to drink 8 ounces of either 100% commercial pomegranate juice (intervention) or apple juice (control) for 3 weeks. Overall, women in the intervention group did not experience any significant decline in serum sex hormones or SHBG compared to women in the control group. In subgroup analyses restricted to 38 normal weight women, women in the intervention group compared to control group had a significant decline in estrone (pg/mL) and testosterone levels (pg/mL): pomegranate: -61.6 [95% confidence interval (CI): -175.8 to 52.6), apple: 1.1 (95% CI: -5.4 to 7.7), P = 0.05, and pomegranate: -289.1 (95% CI: -630.7 to 52.5), apple: 79.6 (95% CI: -77.8 to 236.9), P = 0.03, respectively. Because of several study limitations, results should be considered preliminary. Additional larger trials would be needed to determine effects in normal versus overweight/obese women.

PMID:
26327495
DOI:
10.1080/01635581.2015.1073756
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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