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Drugs. 2015 Sep;75(14):1601-11. doi: 10.1007/s40265-015-0453-3.

Anticancer Drug Delivery: An Update on Clinically Applied Nanotherapeutics.

Author information

1
Université de Lorraine, Centre de Recherche en Automatique de Nancy (CRAN), UMR 7039, Campus Sciences, BP 70239, 54506, Vandœuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex, France. s.marchal@nancy.unicancer.fr.
2
CNRS, Centre de Recherche en Automatique de Nancy (CRAN), UMR 7039, Campus Sciences, BP 70239, 54506, Vandœuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex, France. s.marchal@nancy.unicancer.fr.
3
Research Department, Institut de Cancérologie de Lorraine, Avenue de Bourgogne, 54519, Vandœuvre-lès-Nancy, France. s.marchal@nancy.unicancer.fr.
4
Research Department, Institut de Cancérologie de Lorraine, Avenue de Bourgogne, 54519, Vandœuvre-lès-Nancy, France.
5
Faculté de Pharmacie, Université de Lorraine, 30 rue Lionnois, 54000, Nancy, France.
6
Université de Lorraine, Centre de Recherche en Automatique de Nancy (CRAN), UMR 7039, Campus Sciences, BP 70239, 54506, Vandœuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex, France.
7
CNRS, Centre de Recherche en Automatique de Nancy (CRAN), UMR 7039, Campus Sciences, BP 70239, 54506, Vandœuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex, France.

Abstract

The development of chemotherapy using conventional anticancer drugs has been hindered due to several drawbacks related to their poor water solubility and poor pharmacokinetics, leading to severe adverse side effects and multidrug resistance in patients. Nanocarriers were developed to palliate these problems by improving drug delivery, opening the era of nanomedicine in oncology. Liposomes have been by far the most used nanovectors for drug delivery, with liposomal doxorubicin receiving US FDA approval as early as 1995. Antibody drug conjugates and promising drug delivery systems based on a natural polymer, such as albumin, or a synthetic polymer, are currently undergoing advanced clinical trials or have received approval for clinical applications. However, despite attractive results being obtained in preclinical studies, many well-designed nanodrugs fell short of expectations when tested in patients, evidencing the gap between nanoparticle design and their clinical translation. The aim of this review is to evaluate the extent of nanotherapeutics used in oncology by providing an insight into the most successful concepts. The reasons that prevent nanodrugs from expanding to clinic are discussed, and the efforts that must be taken to take full advantage of the great potential of nanomedicine are highlighted.

PMID:
26323338
DOI:
10.1007/s40265-015-0453-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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