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Appl Environ Microbiol. 2015 Nov;81(21):7610-4. doi: 10.1128/AEM.01673-15. Epub 2015 Aug 28.

Inactivation of foot-and-mouth disease virus by citric acid and sodium carbonate with deicers.

Author information

1
Foot and Mouth Disease Division, Animal and Plant Quarantine Agency, Anyang, Gyeonggi, Republic of Korea.
2
Foot and Mouth Disease Division, Animal and Plant Quarantine Agency, Anyang, Gyeonggi, Republic of Korea leekwn@korea.kr.

Abstract

Three out of five outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) since 2010 in the Republic of Korea have occurred in the winter. At the freezing temperatures, it was impossible to spray disinfectant on the surfaces of vehicles, roads, and farm premises because the disinfectant would be frozen shortly after discharge and the surfaces of the roads or machines would become slippery in cold weather. In this study, we added chemical deicers (ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, sodium chloride, calcium chloride, ethyl alcohol, and commercial windshield washer fluid) to keep disinfectants (0.2% citric acid and 4% sodium carbonate) from freezing, and we tested their virucidal efficacies under simulated cold temperatures in a tube. The 0.2% citric acid could reduce the virus titer 4 logs at -20°C with all the deicers. On the other hand, 4% sodium carbonate showed little virucidal activity at -20°C within 30 min, although it resisted being frozen with the function of the deicers. In conclusion, for the winter season, we may recommend the use of citric acid (>0.2%) diluted in 30% ethyl alcohol or 25% sodium chloride solvent, depending on its purpose.

PMID:
26319879
PMCID:
PMC4592871
DOI:
10.1128/AEM.01673-15
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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