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Vaccine. 2015 Dec 8;33(49):7022-5. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.08.049. Epub 2015 Aug 28.

Why should influenza be a public health priority?

Author information

1
University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Hannover, Germany; Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: albert.osterhaus@tiho-hannover.de.
2
John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA.
3
European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, Solna, Sweden.
4
University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
5
Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie, Legnaro, Italy.

Abstract

Flu risk and burden much higher than assumed: Each year, influenza affects hundreds of millions of people. In order to limit the burden, influenza should remain at the top of the public health priority list. But influenza has attracted less attention recently and priorities and perceptions now differ around the globe, varying with the different cultural and economical contexts. For example, priorities in less-developed countries differ from those in developed countries. For this reason, every approach for raising awareness needs to be tailor-made, capable of responding to every specific stakeholder context. New evidence underpins the effectiveness of flu vaccination in reducing coronary heart disease and death, providing vaccine advocacy with a powerful argument.

KEYWORDS:

Influenza

PMID:
26319062
DOI:
10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.08.049
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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