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Cell. 2015 Aug 27;162(5):933-6. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2015.08.009.

Blended Learning Improves Science Education.

Author information

1
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Biological Sciences, Columbia University, Northwest Corner Building, MC 4846, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027, USA; Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA; Department of Systems Biology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address: bstockwell@columbia.edu.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Department of Population and Family Health, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY 10032, USA.
3
Columbia Center for New Media Teaching and Learning, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA.
4
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Biological Sciences, Columbia University, Northwest Corner Building, MC 4846, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027, USA.

Abstract

Blended learning is an emerging paradigm for science education but has not been rigorously assessed. We performed a randomized controlled trial of blended learning. We found that in-class problem solving improved exam performance, and video assignments increased attendance and satisfaction. This validates a new model for science communication and education.

PMID:
26317458
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2015.08.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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