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PLoS Pathog. 2015 Aug 28;11(8):e1005127. doi: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005127. eCollection 2015 Aug.

Leptomonas seymouri: Adaptations to the Dixenous Life Cycle Analyzed by Genome Sequencing, Transcriptome Profiling and Co-infection with Leishmania donovani.

Author information

1
Life Science Research Centre, Faculty of Science, University of Ostrava, Ostrava, Czech Republic.
2
Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Science, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic.
3
Life Science Research Centre, Faculty of Science, University of Ostrava, Ostrava, Czech Republic; Zoological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg, Russia.
4
Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Science, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic; Biology Centre, Institute of Parasitology, Czech Academy of Sciences, České Budějovice (Budweis), Czech Republic.
5
de Duve Institute and Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium.
6
Life Science Research Centre, Faculty of Science, University of Ostrava, Ostrava, Czech Republic; Biology Centre, Institute of Parasitology, Czech Academy of Sciences, České Budějovice (Budweis), Czech Republic.
7
Biology Centre, Institute of Parasitology, Czech Academy of Sciences, České Budějovice (Budweis), Czech Republic; Faculty of Sciences, University of South Bohemia, České Budějovice (Budweis), Czech Republic; Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
8
Life Science Research Centre, Faculty of Science, University of Ostrava, Ostrava, Czech Republic; Biology Centre, Institute of Parasitology, Czech Academy of Sciences, České Budějovice (Budweis), Czech Republic; Department of Pathology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States of America.

Abstract

The co-infection cases involving dixenous Leishmania spp. (mostly of the L. donovani complex) and presumably monoxenous trypanosomatids in immunocompromised mammalian hosts including humans are well documented. The main opportunistic parasite has been identified as Leptomonas seymouri of the sub-family Leishmaniinae. The molecular mechanisms allowing a parasite of insects to withstand elevated temperature and substantially different conditions of vertebrate tissues are not understood. Here we demonstrate that L. seymouri is well adapted for the environment of the warm-blooded host. We sequenced the genome and compared the whole transcriptome profiles of this species cultivated at low and high temperatures (mimicking the vector and the vertebrate host, respectively) and identified genes and pathways differentially expressed under these experimental conditions. Moreover, Leptomonas seymouri was found to persist for several days in two species of Phlebotomus spp. implicated in Leishmania donovani transmission. Despite of all these adaptations, L. seymouri remains a predominantly monoxenous species not capable of infecting vertebrate cells under normal conditions.

PMID:
26317207
PMCID:
PMC4552786
DOI:
10.1371/journal.ppat.1005127
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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