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Proteomics. 2015 Nov;15(22):3835-53. doi: 10.1002/pmic.201400464. Epub 2015 Oct 26.

Effects of Fe deficiency on the protein profile of Brassica napus phloem sap.

Author information

1
Plant Nutrition Department, CSIC, Aula Dei Experimental Station, Zaragoza, Spain.
2
Department of Plant Nutrition, CEBAS-CSIC, Campus Universitario de Espinardo, Murcia, Spain.
3
Department of Molecular Plant Genetics, Biocenter Klein Flottbek, University Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany.
4
USDA-ARS Children's Nutrition Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.

Abstract

The aim of this work was to study the effect of Fe deficiency on the protein profile of phloem sap exudates from Brassica napus using 2DE (IEF-SDS-PAGE). The experiment was repeated thrice and two technical replicates per treatment were done. Phloem sap purity was assessed by measuring sugar concentrations. Two hundred sixty-three spots were consistently detected and 15.6% (41) of them showed significant changes in relative abundance (22 decreasing and 19 increasing) as a result of Fe deficiency. Among them, 85% (35 spots), were unambiguously identified. Functional categories containing the largest number of protein species showing changes as a consequence of Fe deficiency were signaling and regulation (32%), and stress and redox homeostasis (17%). The Phloem sap showed a higher oxidative stress and significant changes in the hormonal profile as a result of Fe deficiency. Results indicate that Fe deficiency elicits major changes in signaling pathways involving Ca and hormones, which are generally associated with flowering and developmental processes, causes an alteration in ROS homeostasis processes, and induces decreases in the abundances of proteins involved in sieve element repair, suggesting that Fe-deficient plants may have an impaired capacity to heal sieve elements upon injury.

KEYWORDS:

Bidimensional electrophoresis; Brassica napus; Hormones; Iron; Phloem Sap; Plant proteomics

PMID:
26316195
DOI:
10.1002/pmic.201400464
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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