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J Laryngol Otol. 2015 Oct;129(10):1032-5. doi: 10.1017/S0022215115001899. Epub 2015 Aug 28.

Bilateral, independent juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma: case report.

Author information

1
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery and Audiology,Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet,Denmark.
2
Department of Neuroradiology,Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet,Denmark.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a benign, vascular tumour that primarily occurs in adolescent males. Despite its benign nature, aggressive growth patterns can cause potential life-threatening complications. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is normally unilateral, originating from the sphenopalatine artery, but bilateral symptoms can occur if a large tumour extends to the contralateral side of the nasopharynx. This paper presents the first reported case of true bilateral extensive juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma involving clinically challenging pre-surgical planning and surgical strategy.

CASE REPORT:

A 21-year-old male presented with increasing bilateral nasal obstruction and discharge. Examination revealed tumours bilaterally and imaging demonstrated non-contiguous tumours. Pre-operative angiography showed strictly ipsilateral vascular supplies requiring bilateral embolisation. Radical removal performed as one-step, computer-assisted functional endoscopic sinus surgery was performed. The follow-up period was uncomplicated.

CONCLUSION:

This case illustrates the importance of suspecting bilateral juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma in patients presenting with bilateral symptoms. Our management, including successful pre-operative planning, enabled one-step total removal of both tumours and rapid patient recovery.

KEYWORDS:

Angiofibroma; Bilateral Nasal Obstruction; Head And Neck Neoplasms; Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms; Nasopharynx; Therapeutic Embolization

PMID:
26314415
DOI:
10.1017/S0022215115001899
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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